General

  1. How does this process work?

Heat Setting

  1. Do I have to use an iron?
  2. What if my iron dosn't get as hot as some other irons?
  3. When should I peel the backing from the sheet after heat-setting?

Durability

  1. How will it hold up with wear and in the wash?

Inks, Fabrics, and Printers

  1. How does the opaque work?
  2. What fabrics will this process work with?
  3. What brands of inkjet printers will work?
  4. Can I use my stock (oem) printer inks?

General

  1. How does this process work?
    Basically, you're using our heat-transfer papers and your printers inks to create a printed image. Protective layers on the paper itself, when heated against a fabric, bond your ink to the fabric and protect your image from water and wear.

Heat Setting

  1. Do I have to use an iron?
    You can use an iron to transfer if you like. You can also use a heat press or dry-mount press.

    NOTE: Some papers require a heat press.
  2. What if my iron doesn't get as hot as some other irons?
    Some transfer-sheet brands are very particular about the heat and pressure settings in transfer. Not ours! Ours work in a comparatively large range of heat settings (250°F to 400°F).
  3. When should I peel the backing from the sheet after heat-setting?
    You always want to wait a few seconds, but after that, it's up to you. You can wait until it's cool for a more rubbery feel and a little more protection, or as soon as you like for a more natural feel. After washing the print will soften, losing much of the rubbery feel. For mousepads wait only about 5 seconds after heat-pressing and the image will trim itself as you peel off the paper. Otherwise the whole transfer paper with peel and you will need to trim the paper from the mousepad.

Durability

  1. How will it hold up with wear and in the wash?
    Many transfer papers have a problem with cracking, fading, and bleeding, but our InkJet2T still looks great after many washings. It is always a good idea, with any printed shirt, to baby the shirt by minimizing dryer time, not using bleach, turning shirt inside out, and removing shirt very soon after drying. We suggest, since the image is heat-sealed, that you don't iron over the image area after transfer without wax paper between the shirt and heat element. We also suggest you don't dry imaged fabrics in a dryer on hot settings, as this may also damage the image.

Inks, Fabrics, and Printers

  1. How does the opaque work?
    Basically, you're adding a layer of white between your image and the fabric, so any color or shade of fabric can be used without corrupting the colors of the image. Using the Opaque splits the heat-setting process into 2 parts. First, the image is bonded to the opaque layer just as it would be to a T-shirt, but only for a few seconds. Then, the opaque layer (now with transfer sheet attatched) is heat-set as one unit onto your fabric.
  2. What fabrics will this process work with?
    Basically any absorbent fabric will take a heat-set image.
  3. What brands of inkjet printers will work?
    Any non-thermal InkJet Printer, such as Epson, HP, Canon, and Apple.
  4. Can I use my stock (oem) printer inks?
    Absolutely!

Products